Ludlow Pediatrics, Inc. - Ludlow, MA
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Pediatric Drug Dosages

  • Below are recommended doses for several common products.
  • All doses are determined by weight not age.
  • Always check the label for the type of medicine you are giving as well as to check the dosage.
  • If you have any questions as to the correct dosage, please call us during office hours.
  • Make sure you do not mix medicines containing the same components (Tylenol & Feverall® for example).
  • Call the office before giving any medication to infants less than 3 months old.
  • Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) cannot be given to infants less than 6 months old.
  • Acetaminophen maybe given every 4 hours as needed.
  • Ibuprofen maybe given every 6-8 hours as needed.
  • POISON CONTROL: (800) 222-1222.

Acetaminophen is the main ingredient in Tylenol® and Feverall® (rectal suppositories).
Acetaminophen is used as a pain reliever and fever reducer. It should NOT be used in children under 2 months of age. The following products can be used every 4- 6 hours as needed.

Weight
(lbs.)

Infant's and Children's Tylenol Suspension (160mg/5ml)

Tylenol
Chewable
(80 mg)

6-12 lbs. 1/4 tsp. ..
13-17 lbs. 1/2 tsp. 1 tab
18-23 lbs. 3/4 tsp. 1 1/2 tabs
24-35 lbs. 1 tsp. 2 tabs
36-47 lbs. 1 1/2 tsp 3 tabs
48-59 lbs 2 tsp. 4 tabs

Ibuprofen is the active ingredient in Advil® and Motrin®.
Ibuprofen is used to decrease pain and swelling and to reduce fevers. It should not be used in children less than 6 months old without discussing first with your practitioner. All of these products can be given every 6-8 hours as needed.

Weight (lbs.)

Infant's
Ibuprofen Drops (50mg/1.25ml)

Children's
Ibuprofen
(100mg/5ml)

Children's
Ibuprofen
Chewable (50mg)

Junior Strength
Ibuprofen
Chewable or Tabs(100mg)

12-17 lbs. 1.25 ml 1/2 tsp. .. ..
18-23 lbs. 1.87 ml 3/4 tsp. .. ...
24-35 lbs. 2.5 ml 1 tsp. ... .....
36-47 lbs. .. 1 1/2 tsp. 3 tabs ..
48-59 lbs .. 2 tsp. 4 tabs 2 tabs
60-71 lbs. .. 2 1/2 tsp. 5 tabs 2 1/2 tabs

FeverAll® (Rectal Suppositories)
Acetaminophen is the main ingredient in FeverAll
Suppositories are absorbed less consistently than an oral dose and suppositories are meant for short-term use (just while your child can't tolerate oral intake). Doses are every 4-6 hours

Weight (lbs.)
Children's
80 mg
Children's
120 mg

Jr. Strength
325 mg

12-17 lbs. 1 supp. ~ ~
18-23 lbs. 1 ½ supp. 1 supp. ~
24-35 lbs. ~ 1 ½ supp. ~
36-47 lbs. ~ 2 supp. ~
48-59 lbs ~ ~ 1 supp.
60-71 lbs ~ ~ 1 ½ supp.
72-95 lbs ~ ~ 2 supp.

Benadryl (diphenhydramine) is used for hives and to reduce the itchiness associated with certain rashes.
Benadryl can be given every 6-8 hours as needed.

Weight (lbs.)
Benadryl Elixir
(12.5mg/tsp.)
Benadryl Chewable
(12.5 mg)

Benadryl Tabs
(25 mg)

12-17 lbs. 1/2 tsp. .. ..
18-23 lbs. 3/4 tsp. .. ...
24-35 lbs. 1 tsp. 1 tab ..
36-47 lbs. 1 1/2 tsp. 1 1/2 tab ..
48-59 lbs 2 tsp. 2 tab 1 tab

Colds and Coughs
Please remember these are guidelines, follow the manufacturer's label on all products.

We do NOT recommend the use of decongestants, cough suppressants, or other over-the-counter cold medications in children under 6 years of age.

Conversion Chart

It is also important to know how to convert teaspoons to milliliters.
The following is a brief guide:

  • Teaspoon     =     tsp
  • Tablespoon     =     tbsp
  • Milliliters     =     ml


  • ½ tsp     =     2.5 ml     =     2.5 cc
  • 1 tsp     =     5 ml     =     5 cc     =     1/3 tbsp
  • 1 ½ tsp     =     7.5 ml     =     7.5 cc     =     1/2 tbsp
  • 2 tsp     =     10 ml     =     10 cc
  • 3 tsp     =     15 ml     =     1 tbsp     =     1/2 ounce
  • 6 tsp     =     30 ml     =     30 cc     =     1 oz

This content is reviewed periodically and is subject to change as new health information becomes available. The information is intended to inform and educate and is not a replacement for medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional.


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